Tag Archives: Bernie Sanders

Why This Sanders Supporter is Now Supporting The Libertarian

Most of you know that I have been a Bernie Sanders supporter. Most of you didn’t know I was also a John Kasich and Gary Johnson supporter. We have been in the primary season where we look at the crop of candidates among all parties and develop our list of who we would like to see run against each other for the presidency.

While we can only vote in one party’s primary that doesn’t prevent us from favoring candidates in the other parties to win that party’s nomination. Some will favor the weakest candidate in the opposing parties. I favor whoever I think would be the best president in each party.

Had Bernie Sanders won the Democratic nomination I was ready to support him all the way to the White House. I would have supported John Kasich had Bernie Sanders lost but he won. Neither happened so I’m supporting Gov. Gary Johnson.

I know it is hard for some of you to understand how I could go from supporting a democratic socialist to supporting a libertarian but aside from economics they are really very similar. Both support civil liberties, both support civil rights, both support reproduction rights, both support gun rights and both support staying out of wars, including deploying our military to places we have no business deploying and the so-called war on drugs. Both also support reasonable and compassionate immigration policies. All of that is important to me.

Economics? We have proof that both democratic socialism and capitalism work and they also work in mixed systems. Sanders wanted to see free college. Johnson wants to see an end to government backed student loans. Both plans will lower the cost of education to the students and drastically reduce student debt on graduation.

Sanders wants to see free medical care paid for by the government. Johnson wants to see less regulation on insurance companies to allow them to offer policies at lower cost with higher coverage which will allow more people to be insured.

This year, 2016, I have racked up around $100,000 in medical care. I’m insured and my out of pocket cost was $4,000. While free health care would have been great so was having insurance. I don’t care which system we use as long as it goes toward reducing money coming out of my pocket.

I love the idea of a lower tax burden on me but if I’m going to pay taxes I want it to be for services to me and others in the middle and lower classes. I don’t want my tax dollars going to bail out huge banks, oil companies or any other large corporation. Both Johnson and Sanders address that concern I have from different but workable directions.

Economics? There are numerous ways to level the economic playing field and I’m not really concerned with how we get to a fairer economic system as long as we get there. I am concerned about civil liberties just as Sanders and Johnson have both shown to be as concerned with as me.

Check out both Gary Johnson and his running mate, Bill Weld. I think if your concerns are with civil liberties you will like what they are saying. They are both incredibly experienced in successfully administering government.

Sanders isn’t a Democrat; What’s in Party Unity for him?

There is absolutely no reason for Sanders to sacrifice his goals to Democratic party unity, he isn’t a Democrat. I think he knew coming into this campaign that he would either become president or he would retire.

Leading Democrats are growing increasingly vocal in their concerns about the White House hopeful’s continued candidacy, and whether he and his legions of enthusiastic supporters ultimately will unite behind Hillary Clinton in a general election against Donald Trump.   For his part, Sanders has sharpened his critique of the party. He says it would be “sad and tragic” if Democrats don’t stop relying on big money, and he is assailing Clinton for her dependence on wealthy donors.

Source: Some fear Sanders won’t exit gracefully

So, what do they have to negotiate with? This is the only way they are going to have their peaceful convention, by coming to terms with Sanders’ terms. That’s the only way they are going to be able to keep the Sanders supporters in their corner is through negotiation. Loyalty will not come into play here.

There is a very good reason for Sanders to remain in the race until the end.

I like this article. It does a very good job of explaining the Super-delegates purpose and why they should not be counted until the convention. Their vote is suppose to be fluid. It also explains the scenarios by which it would make sense for the Super-delegates to get on the Sanders’ bandwagon.

What makes 2016 very different from 2008 is that the following items are presently true:

  • Sanders has dramatically higher favorable ratings than Clinton, despite months of attacks from his Democratic opponent and Trump and GOP super-PACs generally laying off both Sanders and Clinton;
  • Sanders beats Donald Trump nationally by much more than does Clinton (12 points, as opposed to 6 for Clinton, in an average of all national polls);
  • Sanders beats Donald Trump in every battleground state by more than does Clinton; and
  • Sanders beats Trump by 22 points among independents, while Clinton loses independents to Trump by 2 points.

As we sit here today, the Clinton-Trump match-up in the three biggest battleground states — Ohio, Florida, and Pennsylvania, the loss of all three of which would lose the Democrats the general election — is a dead heat.

Source: Bernie Sanders Could Still Win the Democratic Nomination — No, Seriously

I do not have a lot of confidence in Sanders becoming the Democratic nominee. I also don’t have a lot of confidence in Clinton being able to beat Trump in the general election. It seems that the DNC has signed a suicide pact with Clinton.

Here’s a question to ask yourself….

Nate Robinson brings up a great point in his article:

Trump’s political dominance is highly dependent on his idiosyncratic, audacious method of campaigning. He deals almost entirely in amusing, outrageous, below-the-belt personal attacks, and is skilled at turning public discussions away from the issues and toward personalities (He/she’s a “loser,” “phony,” “nervous,” “hypocrite,” “incompetent.”) If Trump does have to speak about the issues, he makes himself sound foolish, because he doesn’t know very much. Thus he requires the media not to ask him difficult questions, and depends on his opponents’ having personal weaknesses and scandals that he can merrily, mercilessly exploit.

This campaigning style makes Hillary Clinton Donald Trump’s dream opponent. She gives him an endless amount to work with. The emails, Benghazi, Whitewater, Iraq, the Lewinsky scandal, Chinagate, Travelgate, the missing law firm records, Jeffrey Epstein, Kissinger, Marc Rich, Haiti, Clinton Foundation tax errors, Clinton Foundation conflicts of interest, “We were broke when we left the White House,” Goldman Sachs… There is enough material in Hillary Clinton’s background for Donald Trump to run with six times over.

Source: Current Affairs | Culture & Politics

So the question boils down to this, do you want to see Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee for president or do you want to keep Donald Trump out of the White House.

Peter Daou Has a Problem Seeing Reality

Peter Daou has a problem seeing where the problem really is. Well, that’s to be expected he’s been advising Sec. Clinton for a while and you don’t maintain that job without polishing her image.

Why on earth would Bernie Sanders run a campaign premised on the destruction of Hillary’s public image?

As we’ve written: Hillary let Bernie off the hook in the last debate. She could have asked him a simple question: Does he believe President Obama is corrupt because of financial industry contributions? It’s a yes or no question that is central to the 2016 race.

Does Bernie think President Obama is compromised by Wall Street contributions? If so, he should have the courage to say it. If not, he shouldn’t imply that a female candidate would be influenced by donations or speaking fees. There’s a word for that.

Source: Bernie’s Dark Side: The Reckless War on Hillary’s Integrity – Blue Nation Review

First, Bernie isn’t running a campaign premised on the destruction of Hillary’s public image. He’s running a campaign premised on the fact that Wall Street is running amok and compromising our political system with campaign contributions and lobbying for special treatment. This is also a premise that Sec. Clinton claims to accept but only after millions of Wall Street dollars have poured into her family’s foundation and into Super PACs created to put her into the presidency.

Sanders has built his campaign on fighting Wall Street and and its corrupting influence. Are you, Mr. Daou, suggesting that the Sanders campaign should change their tune just because Sec. Clinton appears to have been corrupted by Wall Streets influence? By the way, that is my question, not Sen. Sanders.

Maybe had she not taken millions of dollars from Wall Street she wouldn’t be in this predicament. Don’t blame Sen. Sanders for Sec. Clinton’s apparent corruption.

Dust in the wind?

My friend, Rick, keeps pointing out to me how the Democratic establishment isn’t going to allow Sanders, a party outsider, to win the Democratic nomination for president. He points out that even if he does he will be powerless to implement any of his platform programs and he knows that. This makes him dishonest in his campaign. Chris Hedges thinks he’s dishonest because he won’t speak the truth about his adversary, Hillary Clinton, and in not doing so is duplicitous in the con game she and the Democratic Party is running.

The Democratic Party is a full partner in the corporate state. Yet Sanders, while critical of Hillary Clinton’s exorbitant speaking fees from firms such as Goldman Sachs, refuses to call out the party and—as Robert Scheer pointed out in a column in October—the Clintons for their role as handmaidens of Wall Street. For Sanders, it is a lie of omission, which is still a lie. And it is a lie that makes the Vermont senator complicit in the con game being played on the American electorate by the Democratic Party establishment.

Source: Chris Hedges: Bernie Sanders’ Phantom Movement – Chris Hedges – Truthdig

The idea behind the article is that Sanders isn’t fronting a revolution but just another political campaign and as soon as the election is over his movement will just be dust in the wind.

Maybe. No, probably so. But I still believe that unless Bernie Sanders wins the Democratic nomination you will have a Republican in the White House again.

Yes, There Is A Pragmatic Case for Bernie Sanders

I’ve been trying to explain to people that Hillary Clinton is not the person to nominate as a fire break against the Republicans. Hillary is not the electable candidate. She will not get out the vote like Bernie Sanders will in the general election and she fares worse than Sanders in head to head polling against Republicans.

Chis Cook, in the Atlantic, agrees with me.

On the pragmatics of electability, nearly every major national poll consistently shows Sanders equaling or bettering Clinton against all Republicans. Polls show Sanders nearly tied with Clinton nationally and rising. On electability, if anything, Sanders has the edge right now. There is nothing empirical to suggest Clinton’s superior electability—quite the contrary given her loss to Barack Obama in 2008 and her flagging campaign this year. While Clinton might gain more moderate Independents (particularly against a polarizing Republican nominee), Sanders can inspire massive Democratic and liberal Independent turnout and likely win over many white working-class swing voters.

Source: The Pragmatic Case for Bernie Sanders – The Atlantic

Sanders is attracting young people to the primaries and caucuses in numbers not seen since Kennedy ran for the Democratic nod in ’59. Young people are notorious for not showing up at the polls unless there is someone running who  excites them. Hillary Clinton may be married to the most charismatic president since Reagan but she isn’t the charismatic one and she doesn’t excite young people to get out to vote unless those young people are young Republicans and their vote is against her.

 

A mote in Sanders’ eye?

The Clinton campaign is being sick and tired of all the scrutiny they are facing and the evidence of hypocrisy, ties to the banking industry and other ethical issues this is bringing forward. So they are pointing their fingers at the Sanders campaign and saying, “what about him?”

“There’s a lot of stuff that comes out about Hillary. She’s been scrutinized, scrutinized, scrutinized. I don’t see any of that about Bernie coming out—and there are things,” said Barbara Marzelli, who runs a gardening business in New Hampshire. “It’s like everybody’s throwing spaghetti at the wall and seeing what sticks. They haven’t started to fling spaghetti at Bernie.”

Source: Hillary Clinton and Her Allies Are Starting to Openly Question Bernie Sanders’ Integrity | TIME

That’s all well and good but what happens when you scrutinize someone and all you can find is extremely minor stuff like accepting campaign money from the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee, which accepted money from Wall Street, while claiming not to have received money from Wall Street.

I think he can stand up to the scrutiny but I wonder about the spin.

However, how can the Clinton campaign honestly scream about the mote in Sanders’ eye while she has a log in her own eye?

A bit on health care in Georgia

I pointed out yesterday how Bernie Sanders’ single payer health care system would probably save most of us money, even with a tax increase. The more I think about it the more I’m convinced his plan would actually bring the cost of health care down over time due to people having access to health care at the onset of disease when it is cheaper to treat.

I’m convinced of the same thing here in Georgia with the expansion of Medicaid. However, Gov. Deal is hesitant to sign on due to the cost.

Deal, a Republican, said expansion would have cost Georgia more than $200 million in the fiscal 2017 budget (which will begin July 1). “That number would only continue to grow exponentially,” he told a joint session of lawmakers Wednesday.

Source: Ga. health care costs need limits, Deal says | The Augusta Chronicle

It might grow exponentially for the first few years but I think that would level off and we would eventually see a decline in cost due to a healthier population. Regardless of that, though, the $200 million might be well worth the money if it means making health care available to more Georgians.

BernieCare

BernieCare has been estimated to cost us $15 trillion over ten years. That’s $1.5 trillion a year to cover about 319,000,000 people which is $4,702.19 each for the year or about $90.43 per week per person. That covers everyone. With BernieCare everyone goes to the doctor when they are sick and the government picks up the bill and pays for it by taxing us $90.43 a week per person. That’s $361.71 for a family of four. Does your employer pay for your insurance? I just checked my check stub and I see that $346.02 per week is going to pay for three people’s coverage in my family. That’s my share and my employer’s share. This almost looks like a wash to me.

An Enthusiasm Gap

Ya know what the one thing is I really hate doing when it comes to my civic duty? It’s voting against someone. I’ve had it beat into me that I must educate myself about those people running for office and I must vote.

Great! Now if there was only someone I could vote for and do so passionately, with enthusiasm. Someone I thought would really make a difference and push for the changes I’d like to see happen in government.

Well, maybe I wouldn’t like all the changes he’d push for but I think Bernie Sanders would make a difference, if for no other reason than to challenge the establishment. I could work up some enthusiasm for that and it looks like others can too.

Iowa Democrats are displaying far less passion for Hillary Clinton than for Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont three weeks before the presidential caucuses….

Source: Hillary Clinton Races to Close Enthusiasm Gap With Bernie Sanders in Iowa – The New York Times

And that enthusiasm is showing up in the polls. So it looks like Iowan Democrats are split between those who are enthusiastically voting for a candidate and those who are holding their nose and voting against the Republicans…. or are they?

I contend that under the circumstances those who are voting against the Republicans are actually voting for them when they have a candidate that can garner the enthusiasm that Hillary Clinton fails to do.

Rick Perry vs. Bernie Sanders: Both are Wrong

Rick Perry makes the statement I expected and he’s wrong. I have no problem with legal gun owners with carry permits taking their guns into a movie theater. However, I don’t care how many people had guns to fire back in LaFayette this past week, those two women and the gunman would still be dead. Maybe fewer people would have been wounded, maybe more, but those dead would still be dead.

What disappoints me is Senator Sanders new stance on gun control.

Senator Sanders might once have agreed with Perry that taking guns away is not the solution. Coming from a rural state where hunting is common and gun rights have popular support, Sanders has opposed some of Democrats’ gun control measures. But on Sunday he told NBC’s Meet the Press that he supported a nationwide ban on guns other than those used for hunting.

Source: Rick Perry vs. Bernie Sanders: More guns in movie theaters? – CSMonitor.com

I could understand Bernie changing his position to supporting expanded background checks but his change to ban all guns except for those used for hunting is just bizarre. I thought he had more integrity than to move away from his long held core principles just to pick up support from a demographic of voters.